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When a rental unit is sold, the Tenant does not automatically have to move out.  Read more here...

 

Selling a Rented Property

If a tenanted rental property is being sold, both the Landlord and Tenant have rights and responsibilities under the Residential Tenancy Act.

Showing the Property

According to the BC Residential Tenancy Act (section 29), the Landlord must have the Tenant’s agreement or give the Tenant proper written notice that states the date, time and reason for entry. The Tenant must receive the notice at least 24 hours, and not more than 30 days, before the time of entry. See Rental Forms for a Notice to Enter Premises and learn how to serve this notice.

It's best if the Landlord can serve the Tenant with a schedule of viewing times, otherwise, the Landlord will have to give the Tenant notice each time. Please note that when proper notice has been given, the Landlord can show the rental unit even if the Tenant is not home. A Landlord is allowed to enter the common areas of the property at any time without giving the Tenant notice. 

 

A Landlord must keep in mind that a Tenant is entitled to reasonable privacy and freedom from unreasonable disturbance. A notice indicating that showings will take place daily from 9am to 6pm for a two-week period would be unreasonable.

More information:  Selling a Tenanted Residential Property - RTB Fact Sheet

When a rental unit is sold, the Tenant does not automatically have to move. If the new Landlord or a close family member intends to move in, the original Landlord must serve a Two-Month Notice to End Tenancy for Landlord’s Use of Property. See “Landlord Gives Notice to End the Tenancy” under Section 12.9 of the BC Residential Tenancy Guide.

Ending the Tenancy 

Check out the requirements for a landlord to end a tenancy and find out what it means to end one “in good faith.”

Policy Guideline - Good Faith Requirement when Ending a Tenancy

Landlords giving notice to end a tenancy

Smart Landlord Tip

Have you considered that your Tenant may want to buy the place they are renting?  Why not ask to see if they're interested?

 

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